The Four Keynote Speakers — OAAF Virtual Conference 2021

MARCH 17 2021

THE NEW SCIENCE ON ADDICTION RECOVERY 

During the past 50 years a great deal has been learned about how to provide acute care services for those suffering from addiction, but there has been relatively little emphasis on how best to help individuals attain and maintain remission and recovery over the long-term. Greater recognition of the persistence of post-acute withdrawal phenomena and increased sensitivity to biobehavioral stress had indicated a need for ongoing social and other support infrastructures to enhance coping and resilience and reduce relapse risk. This talk will review the scientific rationale for the need for ongoing recovery monitoring and management services and the recent evidence investigating novel recovery support services.

John f. Kelly, PHD, ABPP; Elizabeth R. Spallin Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; Director, MGH Recovery Research Institute; Program Director, MGH Addiction Recovery Management Service (ARMS); Associate Director, MGH Center for Addiction Medicine

 

— APRIL 14 2021

GOOD OUTPATIENT CARE AS A WAY TO PREVENT COERCION 

In many countries, the number of coercive practices (outpatient commitment as well as compulsory admissions) is on the rise. Based on human rights legislation as well as potential adverse effects of coercive practices, this development is undesirable. The reasons for these increases are largely unknown, and may be caused by more assertive care (finding difficult-to-engage patients) and/or a higher incidence of patients showing suicidal behavior, social breakdown or dangerousness to others. Studies investigating interventions reducing compulsory admissions have shown beneficial effects of crisis plans and a trend was found for integrative care. Focusing on the quality of care within ACT/FACT teams, it was found for example that a lack of assertive care was associated with a higher chance of compulsory admissions. These findings set a challenge for ACT/FACT teams to (1) creating a consciousness of how many and which patients in the teams are confronted with coercive measures and (2) implementing practices to reduce these measures.

Prof. Niels Mulder, MD, PhD, President of the European Assertive Outreach Foundation (EAOF). Professor of Public Mental Health, Erasmus MC and psychiatrist at Parnassia Psychiatric Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands

 

— MAY 19 2021

HOW DOES MY POSITIONALITY IMPACT MY RELATIONSHIP WITH MY SUPERVISEES AND THE CONNECTION WITH OUR CLIENTS? 

Use of self is very important in the work of leadership.  Understanding your positionality helps you to understand the power dynamic of providing supervision to someone that may not have the same positionality as yourself.  You will leave this workshop with a better understanding of your positionality and encouraged to help your staff recognize their own stance as it relates to connecting with the clients they serve.  Your team will in turn become comfortable enough to help clients identify their own personality and how it impacts their relationship with systems and providers.

Pascale Jean-Noel, LMSW, Director of Training ACT Institute/Center for Practice and Innovations, New York, NY

 

— MAY 26 2021

ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION

Technology and new economic models can be very enabling opening a new horizon for vulnerable people in a transforming labour market. Bringing examples from successful initiatives

 ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND ICT BASED SOLUTIONS IN MENTAL HEALTH CARE

Demonstrating the potential of assistive technology in mental health care arguing for a conscious development strategy to embrace innovation

Zsolt Bugarszki, PhD is an Associate Professor of Social Work at Tallinn University in Estonia. His main field is mental health and disability care.

Conference Program and Registration: https://www.ontarioactassociation.com/oaaf-virtual-conference-march-17-2021-to-june-30-2021-via-zoom/